deformed babies
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Newborn with anterior encephalocele.

Newborn with anterior encephalocele.

(Source: millerfamilytenwek.blogspot.com)

A 26-year-old woman, with non-contributive history, was referred to our facility at 21st week of her pregnancy. Her ultrasonographic examination found microcephaly with isolated occipital encephalocele. The pregnancy was terminated and the finding was confirmed.

(Source: sonoworld.com)

Sorry for ignoring this blog all the time, I’m really busy with school! Anyway, here is another pig I own, which has an encephalocele!

Via CDC: Encephalocele is a rare type of neural tube defect (NTD) present at birth that affects the brain. The neural tube is a narrow channel that folds and closes during the third and fouth weeks of pregnancy to form the brain and spinal cord. Encephalocele is described as a sac-like protrusion or projection of the brain and the membranes that cover it through an opening in the skull. Encephalocele happens when the neural tube does not close completely during pregnancy. The result is an opening in the midline of the upper part of the skull, the area between the forehead and nose, or the back of the skull.

Not a human baby, but I figured you guys would like this. Just got this preserved deformed pig today, pretty sure it had a pretty severe case of otocephaly.

(Source: deformed-babies)

elementnumber22 :  Thanks for the awesome informative blog! As someone born with craniostenosis, it's especially fascinating (and scary!) for me. Craniofacial surgeons do some pretty incredible stuff. Thanks again!

I agree. Medicine is amazing! Glad you like the blog. :)

Image: A fetus papyraceus shown with its umbilical cord next to the placenta of its dichorionic diamniotic twin.
A vanishing twin, also known as fetal resorption, is a fetus in a multi-gestation pregnancy which dies in utero and is then partially or completely reabsorbed by the mother or twin.
Occasionally, rather than being completely reabsorbed, the dead fetus will be compressed by its growing twin to a flattened, parchment-like state known as fetus papyraceus.

Image: fetus papyraceus shown with its umbilical cord next to the placenta of its dichorionic diamniotic twin.

A vanishing twin, also known as fetal resorption, is a fetus in a multi-gestation pregnancy which dies in utero and is then partially or completely reabsorbed by the mother or twin.

Occasionally, rather than being completely reabsorbed, the dead fetus will be compressed by its growing twin to a flattened, parchment-like state known as fetus papyraceus.

A 19-year-old woman delivered a healthy, 3270-g female infant at 38 weeks’ gestation. The pregnancy had been uncomplicated except for the death of a twin, which was noted during an ultrasound examination at 23 weeks. The placenta was delivered spontaneously as a single disk with a fetus papyraceus (or fetus compressus) attached to the membranes. The fetus papyraceus (Panel A) had a crown to rump length of 7.5 cm, a measurement consistent with death at 13 weeks, and it contained visible ribs (black arrow), an eye (black arrowhead), a foot (white arrow), and a helical, trivascular umbilical cord (white arrowhead). A radiograph of this fetus (Panel B) showed nearly complete skeletal development. 
In multiple gestations, the intrauterine death of one fetus and conversion to a singleton pregnancy occur frequently. The dead twin can be compressed and incorporated into the placenta of the surviving twin and, if large enough, can be visible on sonography or at delivery.

A 19-year-old woman delivered a healthy, 3270-g female infant at 38 weeks’ gestation. The pregnancy had been uncomplicated except for the death of a twin, which was noted during an ultrasound examination at 23 weeks. The placenta was delivered spontaneously as a single disk with a fetus papyraceus (or fetus compressus) attached to the membranes. The fetus papyraceus (Panel A) had a crown to rump length of 7.5 cm, a measurement consistent with death at 13 weeks, and it contained visible ribs (black arrow), an eye (black arrowhead), a foot (white arrow), and a helical, trivascular umbilical cord (white arrowhead). A radiograph of this fetus (Panel B) showed nearly complete skeletal development.

In multiple gestations, the intrauterine death of one fetus and conversion to a singleton pregnancy occur frequently. The dead twin can be compressed and incorporated into the placenta of the surviving twin and, if large enough, can be visible on sonography or at delivery.

(Source: nejm.org)

Anonymous :  Hi, if you ever get any kind of hate from anyone just tell them that you don't care because I love this blog more than any other blog and I want to thank you so much for having this blog.

Thank you, you’re great!

1000vengefuleyes replied to your post: anonymous asked:Just a suggestion…

What is the link to the humans one, I would love to see it

http://deformed-humans.tumblr.com/ 

There’s not much there right now tho!

mimislamb1 :  Could you share what you know of fetus papyra´ceus? I'm also interested in TTTS (twin to twin transfusion syndrome) and the likelyhood of a normal birth of both fetuses!

I will do some posts about fetus papyraceus and TTTS! As for the likelyhood of a normal birth of both fetuses in TTTS, up to 80-90% of babies die if it is not treated. As for the likelyhood of a normal birth of both fetuses, if the twin-to-twin transfusion is mild, both babies often recover fully. Severe cases may result in the death of a twin. There are also a few procedures that are quite successful in saving the babies, I will make a post about those too. :)